Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Of Flame and Fate by Cecy Robson - Early Review

Release Date: September 26, 2017

Taran Wird, who commands the power to wield fire and lightning, is an oddity in the supernatural world. But neither Taran nor her unique sisters compare to the bizarre entity known as Destiny. And Taran is assigned to protect her.

Born of two witches, Destiny is revered among the supernatural elite for her acute ability to predict the future. Her biggest prophecy involves Taran’s sister, Celia, whom Destiny decreed will bear children strong enough to take on the evil that’s rising. Yet Destiny is not alone in her predictions, or individuality.

When Johnny Fate, a rock star among humans and a male version of Destiny is discovered, his powers and Destiny’s clash, triggering the start of Destiny’s demise and altering the fate of Celia’s unborn children.

Taran, her werewolf lover Gemini, and their allies must determine if it’s Fate who will decide what will become of Celia’s children, or if their lives and the world will perish with Destiny.

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Of Flame and Fate is 8th book in the Weird Girls series and the 3rd book focusing on Taran. It follows Taran Wird as she and her sisters try to protect their sister Celia and the world from impending magical doom (dun dun DUUUUNNNN). 

The strength of the whole series and Taran's books in particular is her voice. Sassy and hilarious, Taran makes for a great narrator. She is so focused on her mission of protecting her sister and in turn, saving the world. The stakes are raised in this book, and Taran's tone and her determination parallels the rising tensions among the supernatural community as things spiral out of control. Through it all, though, is Taran and Gemini's relationship. Sweet, supportive, and always amusing (because their personalities are polar opposites), it is the guiding light in a world of crazy. 

Cecy has set the groundwork for a complex supernatural world and conflict. With Fate and Destiny at odds (literally, as people with strong personalities to boot), the lore is deep and is only building with each book. As more and more is revealed, not only about Celia but about all the Wird sisters, readers can get more and more excited about where the story is going to go (and what the future holds, no matter which sister is your favorite!). 

The book starts off with an action packed battle scene, and while I think they are well written and pull you in immediately to not only the conflict but also Taran's personality, I wish there were a few more intimate moments between Taran and her sisters (and Gemini, though those aren't really lacking) and less non-stop running around. I liked the fact that more is revealed in this book, though I kind of wished that it was revealed more throughout, rather than a lot of it towards the end. It would have tied the story together a little bit between the fight scenes and the ensuing chaos. While I love this series, Celia is still my favorite, and I found myself skimming over some of the fight scenes and not missing any crucial information to look for the presence of the other Wird girls. 

Overall, Of Flame and Fate is a romping, action-packed, romantic story of Taran and her sisters. You have the read Taran's other books, Of Flame and Promise and Of Flame and Light to understand literally anything in this book. My review for Of Flame and Promise is here. I also highly recommend reading the first five books in the series that star Celia, Taran's sister! If you are looking for a well-written, exciting, humor-filled paranormal novel for the fall, this series and this book is just the ticket. 
** I received a free copy of this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review **
Find out more about Cecy Robson and her books here: http://www.cecyrobson.com

Cecy (pronounced Sessy) Robson is the new adult and contemporary romance author of the Shattered Past series, the O’Brien Family novels and new Carolina Beach series, as well as the award-winning author of the Weird Girls urban fantasy romance series. A 2016 double nominated RITA® finalist for Once Pure and Once Kissed, Cecy is a recovering Jersey girl living in the South who enjoys carbs way too much, and exercise way too little. Gifted and cursed with an overactive imagination, you can typically find her on her laptop silencing the yappy characters in her head by telling their stories.

Happy Reading!

Jasmine

Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Coming Up for Air by Miranda Kennealy - Review

Release Date: July 4, 2017

Swim. Eat. Shower. School. Snack. Swim. Swim. Swim. Dinner. Homework. Bed. Repeat.

All of Maggie’s focus and free time is spent swimming. She’s not only striving to earn scholarships—she’s training to qualify for the Olympics. It helps that her best friend, Levi, is also on the team and cheers her on. But Levi’s already earned an Olympic try out, so she feels even more pressure to succeed. And it’s not until Maggie’s away on a college visit that she realizes how much of the “typical” high school experience she’s missed by being in the pool.

Not one to shy away from a challenge, Maggie decides to squeeze the most out of her senior year. First up? Making out with a guy. And Levi could be the perfect candidate. After all, they already spend a lot of time together. But as Maggie slowly starts to uncover new feelings for Levi, how much is she willing to lose to win?

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I am so happy that I got to review Miranda Kenneally's newest Hundred Oaks installment, Coming Up for Air. I love the whole series, one of my favorite books of all time being Breathe, Annie, Breathe (haven't read it? WHAT ARE YOU DOING, GO GET IT!), but Coming Up for Air rose to a solid second. 

Coming Up for Air has all the things one would expect from Miranda: hilarious characters and situations and swoon worthy love interests combined with truly touching conflicts that come with growing up and trying to define yourself and what you want. 

Maggie is such a great character but I really enjoyed how close she is to her group of friends. They all work to bring out characteristics in one another that make all of them more developed, complex, and believable. I thought the dialogue and action between them was so organic and entertaining it was like watching a movie (a really good one). After visiting Cal (Wat up alma mater! GO BEARS!) as an incoming freshmen athlete, she realizes that she isn't as experienced with boys as she thinks she should be. When she comes back, she asks her best friend, Levi, to help her get more comfortable hooking up with guys. Then all the fun stuff starts. What could go wrong, right?

As always, Maggie's story is the perfect combination between rom-com hilarity and very real, very believable coming-of-age struggles. I thought that the friendship between Maggie and Levi was wonderful and organic and that the romance between all the characters and their various interests so accurately describes any and all forms of romance and infatuation found in high school and college. Maggie's relationship with Levi (and Hunter and Georgia) is so open and nonjudgemental (they remind me a lot of Lola and Cricket from Lola and the Boy Next Door!).  The whole idea of "hookups" has been prevalent in so many young adult and new adult novels, but I truly thing that Coming Up for Air is a really great example of exploring the idea in such a way that is respectful and completely believable. I liked that these are semi-professional kids that still flounder around teenage issues. I liked that they are all making mistakes and kind of have no idea what they are doing but are still able to learn from them and laugh about it. I like the range of familial and platonic relationships, from the ideal parents, to the not so ideal, to split families. I LOVED that she talks about casual (safe) sex, the worry around being inexperienced, and high school students being sexually active in various ways. Her characters make as many mistakes as they do good choices and the balance is fantastic. 

Maggie's battle with her own self worth as an athlete and her doubts about what she has and hasn't experienced because of this ambition is a great center to a story of a young woman trying to figure out what's important to her, as both an aspiring Olympian and as a young woman. She must learn to not compare her own accomplishments to others, to be comfortable with change, and to stand up for herself and what she wants. The sports aspect, as usual, is a wonderful frame to a fantastic and dynamic cast of characters, hilarious writing, and swoon-worthy romance. It can be read as a standalone, but I highly recommend all of Miranda's books. 
* I received a copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review*
Find out more about Miranda and her books here: http://mirandakenneally.com

Growing up in Tennessee, Miranda Kenneally dreamed of becoming an Atlanta Brave, a country singer (cliché!), or a UN interpreter. Instead she writes, and works for the State Department in Washington, D.C., where George W. Bush once used her shoulder as an armrest. Miranda loves Twitter, Star Trek and her husband.

Find her on Twitter!

Look at this cute comic of all the amazing female protagonists in the Hundred Oaks series! LOOK AT IT!
Happy Reading!

Jasmine

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

I'm Not With the Band by Amber Garza - Review

I like Kassidy Milton. There, I said it. She’s funny, beautiful—even though she doesn’t know it—and my favorite kind of weird. But I can’t tell if she’s into me or just trying to get close to me for a chance with my famous twin brother instead. I mean, it has to be me. I am the better-looking one.

But Kassidy has some demons, and she’s not good at letting people in. That happens when you’ve been hurt by someone close to you. I can relate. Trust is a funny thing; it’s hard to gain but easy to lose. I might just learn that the hard way.

Disclaimer: This Entangled Teen Crush book includes a snarky heroine, a swoon-worthy hero, crazy best friends, your favorite music, and lots of feels.





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I'm Not in the Band is an adorable story of two teenagers battling their insecurities by relying on their friendship and romantic chemistry. I liked Kassidy and as a person with anxiety, I thought that the character was well written. The reasons she does (or doesn't) do the things she does and responds the way she does, is authentic and really adds to the character.

Sometimes is hard for me to really get into books with dual POVs, especially ones with different genders. However, I think that I'm Not in the Band did a great job of having two very distinct, interesting voices and characters and I loved Archer's sections as much if not more that Kassidy's. 

Archer and Kassidy's relationship, despite starting with a cliche bump in at a concert, develops in a relatively believable way, and the conflicts and insecurities brought to the forefront for both of them make sense and add to the character development. Sometimes I felt that Kassidy's character fell a little flat and was sometimes a little inconsistent. However, her development throughout the story, and Archer's place in really pushing that development, really drives the story. Archer's band of friends also really work to push the story forward and add a lot of voice and humor, making for a funny, sweet, romantic summer read. 
** I received a copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review **

Find out more about Amber and her books here: https://ambergarza.wordpress.com

Amber Garza currently lives in California with her amazing husband, and two hilarious children who provide her with enough material to keep her writing for years.

Amber loves to connect with her readers. You can visit her at ambergarza.com, or find her on Instagram and Facebook as ambergarzaauthor, or on twitter @ambermg1.

Happy Reading!

Jasmine

Thursday, April 13, 2017

Happily Ever After by Kelly Oram - Review




The end of one story is often the beginning of another. Hollywood heartthrob Brian Oliver and his Cinderella princess Ellamara Rodriguez have finally found love outside the digital world. But leaving their anonymity behind creates a whole new set of obstacles for the nation’s new favorite sweethearts. With the stress of Brian’s fame and the pressures of a new relationship weighing down on them, the It Couple quickly begins to wonder if they can hold on to their newfound joy, or if maybe happily ever after is only a fairy tale.







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Hey guys! Long time no see. I'm back with a review or Kelly Oram's Happily Ever After. This is the sequel to Cinder and Ella, an adorable YA modern retelling of the classic fairytale, which some really interesting and unique twists (like Cinderella having a physical disability, a father that is still there but sometimes horrible, and a step-sister who isn't always so bad). This review will contain spoilers for the first book, so if you haven't picked up Cinder and Ella, do so here

Happily Ever After was a fantastic follow up to Cinder and Ella. I read the first book a while ago and for some reason didn't review it, but I remember enjoying it a lot. This book did a great job continuing the story and building the characters, especially our female heroine Ella. After her internet best friend of three years, famous actor Brian Oliver, declares his love for her after meeting at a con promoting his movie, an adaptation of their favorite fantasy book series, she decides to take the plunge and follow her heart. Happily Ever After starts only a week after the end of Cinder and Ella.

I thought that the main conflict of the story was different than most of these kind of retellings (normal girl meets famous boy type). Often the conflict ends up being with dealing with fame or attention or unequal social standing. However, Happily Ever After takes all that in stride to instead focus on Ella's self-confidence issues, as a young woman with a physical disability, and the pressures young people feel towards sex and physical relationships, which are only highlighted by the glamour of Hollywood. 

Ella and Brian are fantastic in this book, and I really appreciated the fact that most of the drama was not about the impending doom of their Cinderella story relationship and more focused on Ella's familial relationship with her estranged father and relationship with her body and mental health as she becomes a public figure via her celebrity boyfriend. The way that the book follows Ella on her journey of self love and self worth is interesting and genuine, and as a person who also struggles with these issues, I found her choices and her bravery to overcome her fears inspiring. I really enjoyed the way that Brian insists on communication and is so supportive as she works through it all. I'm not sure if a guy as perfect as Brian exists, but if he does, I need to find him. Their interactions and dialogue made it feel as though I was watching a romantic comedy and I loved their banter and their connection. All the relationships in both this book and Cinder and Ella are nuanced and authentic and I thoroughly enjoyed following Ella on her journey to being the kickass woman that everyone knew she was. 

Happily Ever After is a fantastic follow up to Cinder and Ella. Expanding on the deep set issues such as family, self-worth, and peer pressure, it is a romantic, hilarious, heartfelt story of a girl who is not afraid of anything but her own potential to take the world by storm and the people who help her realize she is capable of anything. 
Find out more about Kelly and her books here: https://kellyoram.com

Kelly Oram wrote her first novel at age fifteen–a fan fiction about her favorite music group, The Backstreet Boys, for which her family and friends still tease her. She’s obsessed with reading, talks way too much, and likes to eat frosting by the spoonful. She lives outside of Phoenix, Arizona with her husband, four children, and her cat, Mr. Darcy.

Happy Reading!

Jasmine

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Rebel of the Sands by Alwyn Hamilton - Review

She’s more gunpowder than girl—and the fate of the desert lies in her hands.

Mortals rule the desert nation of Miraji, but mystical beasts still roam the wild and barren wastes, and rumor has it that somewhere, djinni still practice their magic. But there's nothing mystical or magical about Dustwalk, the dead-end town that Amani can't wait to escape from.

Destined to wind up "wed or dead," Amani’s counting on her sharpshooting skills to get her out of Dustwalk. When she meets Jin, a mysterious and devastatingly handsome foreigner, in a shooting contest, she figures he’s the perfect escape route. But in all her years spent dreaming of leaving home, she never imagined she'd gallop away on a mythical horse, fleeing the murderous Sultan's army, with a fugitive who's wanted for treason. And she'd never have predicted she'd fall in love with him... or that he'd help her unlock the powerful truth of who she really is.

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This book was in my iBooks library since it came out. SINCE IT CAME OUT PEOPLE. THAT MEANS IT WAS SITTING THERE FOR ALMOST A YEAR. UNREAD. WHAT WAS I THINKING?

But actually this book was fantastic. The world building and characters are incredibly developed and complex. The mix of cultures and eras and genres is exciting and original while also harkening back to traditional folklore and stories. I'd like to see Amani take on any of the famous, badass women that are taking over YA right now, for it would be a sight to see (or read, I guess). In short, I thought that Rebel of the Sands was a unique, exciting adventure with an amazing and inspiring heroine and I can't believe I didn't read this sooner. 

Two things really shine in this book: the characters and the world-building. These two elements tied together are what really makes this story amazing, in my opinion. Amani reminded me so much of Renee Ahdieh's Shahrzad from the Wrath and the Dawn but is wholly a badass female heroine all on her own. Her determination really drives the story and is at the center of its motivation. The way she approaches the world takes the caution and the cynicism seen a lot in YA literature but also adds this element of hope and ambition and sensibility. The way that she uses weapons, mechanical ones like guns and bombs, in a world that resonates with old fairytales set in Persia or the Middle East (or almost like Agraba from Aladdin) really differentiates Amani's story from any others. I loved the mixture of machines and magic, and how those tensions affect the world as well as Amani's own personal journey. The story as a whole likes to play with shades of grey - one can be a hero and an outlaw, the land can be as barren as it is lush, and everyone is more than they seem. Part fantasy, part western, the world is familiar and yet undiscovered - the readers and the characters keep finding new ways this world works and is changing, balanced on the edge of a knife between ancient magic and mechanic modernity.

An excellent cast of secondary characters round out this series. Jin is a perfect foil to Amani. I really enjoyed that I didn't like him at first, that I was as suspicious of him as Amani was. I also liked that while I could predict what part he was going to play, his character didn't read as too predictable, and his part in the story is one that barely slips by being too cliche. The rest of the cast of characters, while all working to fill in the necessary gaps of an adventure/fairytale story (the "evil" aunt, uncle, and cousin, for example), are all well fleshed out and, like Jin, I think do just enough to not fit too nicely into the classic molds. 

If you couldn't tell, I loved this book. I started reading it late one night after noticing that Traitor to the Throne had come out and then kicked myself for waiting so long. The only consolation was that the sequel had just come out, so I didn't have to wait. Unfortunately, now I have to wait for the third book.

If you haven't read Rebel of the Sands yet, I highly recommend. It has something for everyone - a kickass heroine who lives in a world with both guns and magics, with trains that roll through deserts that were once ruled by ancient, powerful, ruthless beings. It has action, magic, a little bit of romance, and a world that leaves the reader with infinite imaginings. 

The second book, Traitor to the Throne is out now! My review for it will be out next Tuesday. 
Find out more about Alwyn Hamilton and her books here: http://alwynhamilton.com

Alwyn Hamilton was born in Toronto and spent her childhood bouncing between Europe and Canada until her parents settled in France. She grew up in a small town there, which might have compelled her to burst randomly into the opening song from Beauty and the Beast were it not for her total tone-deafness. She instead attempted to read and write her way to new places and developed a weakness for fantasy and cross-dressing heroines. She left France for Cambridge University to study History of Art at King’s College, and then to London where she became indentured to an auction house. She has a bad habit of acquiring more hardcovers than is smart for someone who moves house quite so often.

Happy Reading!

Jasmine

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Geekerella by Ashley Poston - Review

Geek girl Elle Wittimer lives and breathes Starfield, the classic sci-fi series she grew up watching with her late father. So when she sees a cosplay contest for a new Starfield movie, she has to enter. The prize? An invitation to the ExcelsiCon Cosplay Ball, and a meet-and-greet with the actor slated to play Federation Prince Carmindor in the reboot. With savings from her gig at the Magic Pumpkin food truck (and her dad’s old costume), Elle’s determined to win…unless her stepsisters get there first.

Teen actor Darien Freeman used to live for cons—before he was famous. Now they’re nothing but autographs and awkward meet-and-greets. Playing Carmindor is all he’s ever wanted, but Starfield fandom has written him off as just another dumb heartthrob. As ExcelsiCon draws near, Darien feels more and more like a fake—until he meets a girl who shows him otherwise. But when she disappears at midnight, will he ever be able to find her again?

Part romance, part love letter to nerd culture, and all totally adorbs, Geekerella is a fairy tale for anyone who believes in the magic of fandom.

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Geekerella fulfilled all of my expectations plus more. It was a fantastic take on the classic story with the addition of fandoms, a crazy convention, unique characters, and one adorable Weiner dog (who I didn't even notice on the cover at first but look! He's SO CUTE!). 

Like I said, Geekerella is (obviously?) a modern retelling of Cinderella. However, Ashley makes this story interesting and unique with a fan convention instead of a royal ball, a vegan food truck instead of a magic pumpkin, and an adorable Frankenweiner instead of mice. The characters have more depth, being diverse and representing often overlooked minorities. I loved the small touches that give all the characters life and thought they worked together to make the book original and not too predictable in a story everybody already knows. Elle and Darien make for believable heroines, each with their own conflicts and struggles, particularly with their families, their aspirations, and their love of Starfield

The other star of this story is the focus on Starfield and the people that love it. I loved the way Ashley discusses the passion fans feel towards their favorite shows, the way both Elle and Darien overcome other's ideas of fandoms to show how much they relate to Starfield and how much it means to them. In a world where they both feel like outsiders and alone, this con and this show gives them a safe place with characters and people they love. The way they gain courage and inspiration from the characters of Starfield is relatable and adorable and really helps both the characters and the plot to be fresh and relevant. 

There were points where I wished there was slightly more original elements from Cinderella, though I totally understand why it followed very closely to the classic story. Darien and Elle both spend a good while taking crap from people around them, over and over again, when I felt like it wouldn't have been weird begin to break away a little sooner. I also wished we got even more information on Starfield (I know, I'm crazy, right?!). While I love retellings, sometimes knowing exactly what's going to happen wears on you as read, and I think that for the most part, Ashley did a great job in keeping the story new and different. 

Overall, I loved Geekerella. It's a fun, original romp through a classic story. The characters are great (I especially loved Sage and Franko) and the details surrounding the fictional Starfield are fantastic. I loved the modern touches and the representation of characters. The passion with which these characters love the things they do, and learn to love them without shame or embarrassment with those who love and support them, is a wonderful message and is at the heart of this story.
* I received a copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review *
Find out more about Ashley Poston and her works here: http://casuallybeingweird.com

Ashley Poston's fangirl heart has taken her everywhere from the houses of Hollywood screenwriters to the stages of music festivals to geeky conventions (in cosplay, of course). She lives in South Carolina, where she hangs around the internet tweeting as @AshPoston.

(I highly recommend following her on Twitter!)

Happy Reading!

Jasmine

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Feversong by Karen Marie Moning - Review

#1 New York Times bestselling author Karen Marie Moning returns with the epic conclusion to her pulse-pounding Fever series, where a world thrown into chaos grows more treacherous at every turn. As Mac, Barrons, Ryodan, and Jada struggle to restore control, enemies become allies, right and wrong cease to exist, and the lines between life and death, lust and love, disappear completely.

Black holes loom menacingly over Dublin, threatening to destroy the Earth. Yet the greatest danger is the one MacKayla Lane has unleashed from within: the Sinsar Dubh—a sentient book of unthinkable evil—has possessed her body and will stop at nothing in its insatiable quest for power.

The fate of Man and Fae rests on destroying the book and recovering the long-lost Song of Making, the sole magic that can repair the fragile fabric of the Earth. But to achieve these aims, sidhe-seers, the Nine, Seelie, and Unseelie must form unlikely alliances and make heart-wrenching choices. For Barrons and Jada, this means finding the Seelie Queen who alone can wield the mysterious song, negotiating with a lethal Unseelie prince hell-bent on ruling the Fae courts, and figuring out how to destroy the Sinsar Dubh while keeping Mac alive.

This time, there’s no gain without sacrifice, no pursuit without risk, no victory without irrevocable loss. In the battle for Mac’s soul, every decision exacts a tremendous price.

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Feversong is the conclusion to Mac's and Barron's story in the Fever series. In order to have any idea of what's going on, you have to read at least the majority of the books before it. But if you're all caught up, I have to say that Feversong is a fantastic ending to Mac's story and one of the better, if not best, story in the series thus far. I don't have the expertise to summarize the story so far so this review is going to focus primarily on the story in this book alone. 

This series is incredibly complex, with a lot of characters and developed magical lore and a unique version of Dublin. Sometimes I find it a little too confusing. Who is Barron's? What is Mac, really? Who is the Unseelie King? How the heck can a magical book be so freaking evil? Is all this written in the stars or is it a mess of their own making? WHO KNOWS? NOT ME!

That being said, Feversong does a great job of answering a lot of these questions (but not all). I think that the development of the characters, from Dani/Jada to the Unseelie King and his consort, and then especially with Mac and Barrons, really drives this story forward and helps readers understand what is really going on. I really enjoyed seeing these characters grow and figure out how to save the world from being sucked into a magical black hole. Literally. You also learn more about the Unseelie King and the magic he created for his human consort and how that plays into the problems for Mac and the crew, which makes what might otherwise be seem like a disjointed story more linear. 

At its heart, this book is the story of Mac. Barrons and Jada play a large part as well but I've always felt like Mac is the heart of this series. And in this book, Mac experiences an entire spectrum of highs and lows and everything in between. Even when she makes decisions with the best intentions, horrible things happen. Karen Marie Moning pulls no punches when it comes to violence and darkness and the evil found in the world and Mac takes the brunt of most of it. The person that she comes out of in the end, though, is a revelation and her relationship with Barrons is fantastic. I always felt a little uneasy about the ways they used one another but the way their relationship develops in this book is great and soothed my aching soul (and made the book what it is, I really think).

I don't want to spoil anything, so I feel like I can't say too much more. Basically, I think that Feversong, while sometimes being too ambitious in its storytelling and becoming too convoluted, does a pretty good job in wrangling readers back into the characters and the world and the romance, not only of Mac and Barrons but of humanity with the earth, with the things that people love that are ugly and messed up and utterly human. It stays true to the series by being purposely ambiguous at the end of the true nature of the story, if it was destiny or choice, if the people you thought you knew were more than you were ever told, but if it was all spelled out for us, it would be a fitting ending to this story. Part of the magic that first captured Mac's eye is the mystery of beautiful things like Barrons, and so it's only right that it's what captures reader's eyes as well.

Overall, I think this book is a great ending to the series, as well as one of the stronger books of the series on its own. I highly recommend that even if you had some trouble with some of the Fever books you read this, if only to get some well-deserved answers and some steamy Mac/Barrons romance. 
Find out more about Karen Marie Moning and her works here: https://karenmoning.com

KAREN MARIE MONING is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of the Fever series, featuring MacKayla Lane, and the award-winning Highlander series. She has a bachelor’s degree in society and law from Purdue University.

You can find her on Facebook at Facebook.com/​KarenMarieMoningfan

You can fin her on Twitter at @KarenMMoning

Happy Reading!

Jasmine